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How to Become a Travel Agent - Career Salaries, Job Stats & Education

How to Become a Travel Agent - Career Salaries, Job Stats & Education

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Save 30% off course fees when you enrol and pay in full*.

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Save 30% off course fees when you enrol and pay in full*.

Offer ends on 31st May at 11.59pm AEST. *Terms & conditions

/ How to Become a Travel Agent - Career Salaries, Job Stats & Education

Thinking of a Travel Agent Career?

If travelling is your life’s desire, then there are careers that offer you the opportunity to assist other travellers to make the most of their holidays. Get to know new and exciting places, help find accommodation and flights and advise people on their sightseeing opportunities.

Job Outlook Average Salary Work Hours Age Groups
Education Level Skills Trends Courses Interview with a Pro

 

Tourism and Travel Agents Job Outlook

Tourism job outlook (gov data)

The graph shows historical and projected (to 2019) employment levels (thousands) for this occupation.

Source: *Job Outlook Government website. ABS Labour Force Survey, DEEWR trend data to November 2014 and DEEWR projections to 2019. Estimates have been rounded.

The (internet) vacancy level for Tourism and Travel Agents is high. Annually, 15.3 per cent of Tourism and Travel Advisers leave this group, creating potential job openings (this compares with 13.1% across all occupations). 

Employment for Tourism and Travel Agents to 2018-19 is expected to grow strongly. Employment in this large occupation (23 900 in November 2011) had only a slight increase in the past five years.

Tourism and Travel Advisers Salaries

Tourism job salary

Source: *Job Outlook Government website. ABS EEBTUM survey August 2014 cat. no. 6310.0. Estimates have been rounded and consequently some discrepancies may occur between sums of the component items and totals.

Note: These figures are indicative and cannot be used to determine a particular wage rate.

Payscale.com lists the average wage of Travel Agents Salary at $43 000 per annum. 

There were around 513,700 persons employed directly in tourism in 2010–11. Being a labour-intensive industry, tourism’s share of jobs in Australia (4.5%) was greater than its direct economic contribution (2.5%). *Australian Government Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism,September 2012 Findings.

Tourism and Travel Weekly Work Hours

Tourism Work - Weekly work hours

The graph shows the average weekly hours (by gender and full-time and part-time) worked for this occupation, compared with all occupations. 

Pay may be lower than the national average but the workplace culture and total number of hours worked per week encourage a healthier work/life balance.

Source: *Job Outlook Government website. ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2014.

Tourism and Travel Agents Age Profile

Tourism workers age group

As expected, the Tourism industry has a strong appeal amongst young people, making it a vibrant and dynamic work environment.

 Source: ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2012.

New Legislation Affecting Tourism Careers

More growth is on the horizon. The Tourism Forecasting Committee expects total visitor consumption to reach $102 billion in 2012–13, with international arrivals to reach over six million.

Under Tourism 2020, the Australian Government is working with industry and state and territory governments to assist the industry to achieve its potential of $140 billion in overnight spend by 2020. *Australian Government Department of Resources, Energy and Tourism, September 2012 Findings.

Tourism Workers Education Levels

Tourism Workers by Education Level

Source: *Job Outlook Government website. ABS Labour Force Survey, annual average 2014.

Tourism Skills Trends

Tourism Research Australia latest employment research suggest that growth in tourism employment is more likely due to growth in education tourism than in leisure travel, the segment that we might normally look to as an indicator of tourism performance. 
As a result, tourism employment moves toward highly qualified professionals and, to some extent, away from low skill positions more commonly associated with leisure tourism. 

Tourism and Hospitality Courses by Open Colleges

Hospitality can be a dynamic and fast-paced working environment and those who love it often say they wouldn’t do anything else. Choosing to study Tourism or Hospitality can assure that you have the skills and training to get ahead in these very lucrative sectors.

Certificate III in Tourism (Retail Travel Sales)

If you’re planning on an exciting career in tourism, this course will set you on the path of greater learning, covering understanding of cultural expectations and the wider functions of the tourism market. You’ll also learn a variety of tasks such as marketing, making bookings and travel documentation.

Certificate IV in Tourism

This Certificate will provide you with the advanced skills required to undertake work in a senior role in the travel sector. Use your skills to deal effectively with conflict situations, demonstrate leadership and coach others on the job. This could be a pathway to further study in tourism.

Open Colleges Certificate in Galileo

In partnership with Galileo by Travelport, this course demonstrates how to use the Galileo computer reservation system enabling travel agents and airlines to access information about flight schedules, fares, hotel rates, car rentals and other essential travel information.

Why Study Tourism and Hospitality through Open Colleges?

Our Tourism and Hospitality courses are delivered online, giving you the flexibility of organising your study around your life. You can enrol anytime of the year and study at your own pace.

Among other things, you'll learn how to work with colleagues and customers and in a socially diverse environment. You’ll learn how to develop and update tourism industry knowledge and deal with conflict situations.

You'll also learn how to lead and manage people, implement and monitor workplace health, safety and security practices and how to sell tourism products and services.

Your course includes comprehensive student support to help you throughout your study. Some of the certificates allow you to graduate with a government-accredited, nationally recognised qualification that can boost your chances of employment.

Interview with a professional from the Tourism Industry

Lori Robinson MedlinLori Robinson Medlin
President/CEO, Halifax County Convention & Visitors Bureau

 

In two sentences, tell us what a bit about your role in the Travel industry.

My goal has always been to use the power of tourism to uplift impoverished areas and the people. I’m proud of the tourism industry because it is a clean industry where visitors come to explore the best of what your area has to offer and in turn help the economies of many low-wealth nations.

What does a Travel professional do on a day to day basis?

A travel professional showcases an area that you would like people to explore. They do everything from writing a hand-written thank you note to tweeting about an event, from greeting visitors at the door and helping them get from place to place to designing a mobile app. You have to have your feet in both worlds, offering old-fashioned, personalised customer service and high-tech marketing and information.

At the core, we work with people on a daily basis, whether helping an individual decide to relocate to our area, giving information on attraction and hotels, working with politicians and community leaders to construct new facilities like meeting space and athletic complexes to attract more visitors to the area.

What are the best parts of the job?

The best part of tourism is essentially connection with people on a positive level. Everything we do is designed to make the places that we market to visitors better for both visitors and the residents who live there.

We share positive, uplifting stories and constantly rediscover and promote what is unique about our area.

What skills/attributes do potential Travel industry employees need to have?

You really have to enjoy interaction with people. You have to be able to change gears quickly and be flexible, never knowing what the day is going to bring. You have to be able to take criticism. You are going to get complaints from visitors, and you need to make them feel better about their experience and solve their problems or make the situation better if you can.

What're your favourite things about working in the Travel Industry?

My favourite things about working in the travel industry are the opportunities to travel and to put the best face forward of the area that I promote. I also find that my colleagues in the industry are a fun-loving, gregarious, hard-working group that I enjoy spending time with.

The creativity that is involved in promoting an area means that you are constantly learning and thinking of new things to offer and new ways to share information. There is never a dull moment, and you never have the same day twice.

Thanks Lori, for sharing your story with Open Colleges.

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