Archive for the ‘Memory Tricks’ Category

  • How Taking Photos Impacts Our Memory

    Researchers at Fairfield University in Connecticut have found the way we take a photo of an object makes a difference in our ability to recall it later. The research team, led by Linda A. Henkel, conducted two studies to determine whether taking photos of objects affects our ability to remember details about them later on…. Read More

  • Memory Tricks: Clear Speech Enhances Recall

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    November 21st, 2018 No Comments Features, Memory Tricks

    At the University of Texas at Austin, linguistic researchers have found that we recall information from conversations better when we’ve been listening to someone who speaks clearly, as it frees up cognitive resources which would otherwise be used to decipher the words themselves rather than the meaning behind them. These findings have promising implications for… Read More

  • 5 New Ways to Improve Your Memory

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    September 6th, 2018 3 Comments Features, Memory Tricks

    We’ve all heard about memory strategies like spaced repetition and retrieval practice, but what else is there? Actually, neuroscientists are discovering some pretty exciting things about the way memory works, and as always, we’re here to share their research with you. Here are five ways to improve your memory based on the latest findings: 1…. Read More

  • Memory Tricks: The Production Effect

    The production effect, coined by researchers at the University of Waterloo in 2010, was first observed in language learners who improved recall for new words by speaking them aloud. It was first documented in a series of experiments in which “the mere act of reading words aloud resulted in substantially better memory than reading them… Read More

  • Collaborative Inhibition: How Group Work Harms Memory

    Collaborating in a group to remember information can actually harm recall, according to new research from the University of Liverpool. The study, which was conducted by psychologists from both Liverpool and the University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), analysed 64 earlier studies on collaborative memory and provides the “first systematic investigation into the costs… Read More