• Action Research: The Ultimate Problem-Solving Strategy for Educators

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    December 13th, 2015 No Comments Features
    Action research

    “The desire of teachers to use approaches that ‘fit’ their particular students is not dissimilar to a doctor’s concern that the specific medicine being prescribed be the correct one for the individual patient. The ability of the action research process to satisfy an educator’s need for ‘fit’ may be its most powerful attribute.” –Richard Sagor… Read More

  • How Storytelling Can Enhance Any Learning Experience

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    December 5th, 2015 3 Comments Features
    history

    Hemingway once wrote a six-word novel that reads as follows: “For sale: baby shoes, never worn.” What makes it famous, other than the author? Neuroscientist Paul Zak would say a) its appeal to the brain’s short attention span, b) the power of its emotional impact, and c) the surprising economy of the two combined. Researchers… Read More

  • Top 50 EdTech Products For Educators

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    November 29th, 2015 1 Comment Features
    learning technology quote

    How do you know a good edtech product when you see one? In April, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan released a free guide to “help entrepreneurs apply technology in smart ways to solve identified and persistent problems in education.” The Ed Tech Developer’s Guide: A Primer for Developers, Startups and Entrepreneurs specifically endorses Kaplan,… Read More

  • The Changing Role of the Teacher: 5 Ways to Adapt

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    November 22nd, 2015 1 Comment Features

    It’s time to redefine what it means to teach. Students already learn much differently than they did a decade ago, but educators have been slow to adapt, causing a rift between instructor and pupil that manifests itself in sliding test scores, retention rates, and educational quality in general. With the advent of more sophisticated learning… Read More

  • 8 Alternatives to High-Stakes Standardised Tests

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    November 21st, 2015 No Comments Features
    Quote14

    It’s official: standardised tests are so unpopular that educators must now bribe students into taking them. Washington Post blogger Valerie Strauss describes how, in New Jersey, leaders of one district created an “incentive program” designed to give students treats “based on their participation and performance on the Common Core exam.” The program included an American… Read More